Scaled to Size

I'm sure many of you have come across the frustrations of using a scale. From previous years of losing weight, I too have my share of irritations, aggravations and disappointments with using the scale. In the past, I have changed to a healthier diet and started a weekly exercise routine. After a month I have yet to see the scale move or make any significant changes. I once had a fitness trainer* a few years back and even he was surprised at my lack of progress when it came to weight loss.

I am fully aware that the scale does not necessarily show fitness progress. At the rate that I exercise, I'm bound to gain muscle and muscle does weight more than fat. After a 2-3 months of rigorous training and dieting, I have only managed to only lose a demoralizing 5-7 pounds. Not that's a bad thing, but I was expecting more.

Perhaps it's societal expectations and the results of others that have pushed the idea that everyone should have similar results after following a set of fitness and nutritional guidelines. "Just follow this meal and exercise plan for three months, and watch those pounds of fat disappear!" The only thing that is disappearing  is my moral. Shortly after, I feel the frustrations and dissatisfactions with my results and eventually I quit. Not because it was too hard, but because I wasn't seeing the results others achieved.

Just follow this meal and exercise plan for three months, and watch those pounds of fat disappear!

After a while I have learned to deal with the scale frustrations. Currently I have lost somewhere between 3-4 pounds since the beginning of the year (Jan 2015). I found that is similar to my past results and have accepted that. However, I also realized that after a few months of following my diet and exercise plan, I tend to lose weight significantly faster than the first few months. In the beginning my body just doesn't lose weight as fast as other people.  The real trick to losing weight is being committed to your plans and to give your body a chance to work itself out. I didn't gain all this weight in a matter of 3-4 months so why should I expect to lose it within that same amount of time.

Other forms of measuring weight loss is to measure around your arms, thighs, waist and neck. The easiest way that I found is to take note of your clothes. I tend to notice my clothes fitting better or more lose. My belt begins to go down a few notches while my shirts don't seem to be bursting at the seams especially when I sit down. I'm sure many other people have similar issues and I'd like to know your thoughts about scale frustrations.

This is an Anchor Blue* shirt I purchased over 5 years ago but never had the chance to wear it because it was too small. I wanted to keep this shirt as a reminder to myself that I will one day fit in it again. Today I wanted to try this on and to my surprise, it actually fit without any struggle with the buttons.  *Anchor Blue went out of business in 2010. 

This is an Anchor Blue* shirt I purchased over 5 years ago but never had the chance to wear it because it was too small. I wanted to keep this shirt as a reminder to myself that I will one day fit in it again. Today I wanted to try this on and to my surprise, it actually fit without any struggle with the buttons. 

*Anchor Blue went out of business in 2010. 

*The first time I signed up for a gym membership, I had a 10 day free trial with a fitness trainer. He showed me the correct methods in using various machines and other exercise routines to try out. I fully recommend getting one if you are unaware of properly utilizing the various machines around the gym. Instead of exercising 10 consecutive days with the trainer, I only met with him once a week for 10 weeks. Each week he showed me something new and at the end of the month he recorded my measurements. It helped with my motivation as every time I got measured, I wanted to see results.